August 7, 2020

The Niche

Knoepfler lab stem cell blog

Month: April 2017

2 min read

In case you have some free time for reading this week, here’s a list containing an assortment of interesting research articles and stem cell headlines. I’ve thrown some oddballs in there too including one article from May 1983, when I was just finishing up junior high. No, I didn’t write it. And no the headline for this current blog post is not referring to stem cell-themed pubs where you can go get some ale made from stem cells, but that’s not a bad idea, …Read More

7 min read

Can science now cure MS in some patients with stem cells or is that near on the horizon? What about stem cells for other serious autoimmune disorders? What are the risks to patients in terms of health, money, and hope? What if patients must find $100,000 or $200,000 just to get into a clinical trial for this and insurance only sometimes helps in a big way? Will the trial conclude with an approved product that works and is safe enough? It’s always complicated with an ongoing …Read More

1 min read

One of my kids and I attended the March for Science In Sacramento this past Saturday. It was a lot of fun, energizing, and interesting. I found it encouraging and exciting to see thousands of people gathered in support of science. There were tons of scientists, but quite a few people who were not scientists themselves, but supported science. Some of the signs and other expressions of support for science or concerns about the current political climate on science were particularly intense and thought-provoking. I liked …Read More

10 min read

Dr. Richard Burt of Northwestern University has been doing cutting edge research on the use of stem cells for autoimmune disorders for more than a decade. The core idea behind the work that Burt and other research teams are doing is that stem cells may have revolutionary potential to somehow counteract the autoimmunity that causes serious, life threatening diseases in many patients, including those suffering from particularly aggressive forms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Some have recently been characterizing Dr. Burt’s MS experiments as potential …Read More