December 1, 2020

The Niche

Knoepfler lab stem cell blog

2 min read

This is the first post in a series focusing on stem cell advances related to specific diseases. Today we discuss Huntington’s Disease and a paper that came out yesterday in the journal Neuron that provides some significant insight into the mechanisms behind the disease. It is entitled: Huntingtin Is Required for Mitotic Spindle Orientation and Mammalian Neurogenesis Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive neurological problems caused by neurodegeneration. The cause of HD was discovered to be mutations in a gene …Read More

3 min read

Update: Now in 2020 it seems that peer review remains very problematic. The Scientist has a few pieces out on the trouble with peer review including my personal favorite: I Hate Your Paper. That article rings so true as do the quotes from the scientists. Peer review in the stem cell field and the IPS cell subfield in particular is even worse than average. It is not unusual for a reviewer to ask for something simply for the purpose of either killing or delaying a …Read More

5 min read

Regenerative medicine is very exciting. But what’s even better than regenerative medicine? Preventative medicine. If one can prevent a problem for occurring in the first place, it is far better than trying to treat it after the fact. Of course in many cases we do not know the causes of diseases so it is difficult to prevent them. However, many diseases are likely caused by problems with stem cells. Therefore, stem cell research, including the work being done funded by CIRM, is likely to …Read More

3 min read

Update in 2020: It was kind of wild to read this post now so many years later as an “old” professor, seemingly ages from the realm of new PIs (principle investigators). What do you think? You can read more about the current state of our lab here. It’s an exciting feeling coming into a new lab as a new professor. An empty lab has so much potential and one can imagine how one’s lab will look in the future. I walked into my lab …Read More