New Yamanaka interview gives key insights into future of IPS cells

Shinya yamanaka

Wikipedia photo

Where is the field of IPS cells going and how will this impact the overall field of stem cell-based regenerative medicine?

Nobel Laureate Shinya Yamanaka, the discoverer of IPS cells, gave a really interesting recent interview to Nikkei that provides some fascinating insights into the future of this exciting technology that is now more than a decade old.

For simplicity I have indicated top highlights from the Yamanaka interview below as bullet points.

  • More IPS cell trials are on track to start as soon as 2018 in Japan.
  • Yamanaka said that trials for Parkinson’s, Spinal Cord Injury, and Heart Disease are amongst the planned IPS cell trials in Japan.
  • There are also plans for clinical studies on cancer and kidney disease, perhaps further down the road such as 2019-2020?
  • Immune rejection and cancer risks must still be evaluated, he said.
  • There are likely to be important differences in the new studies versus use in the eye.
  • CiRA has started working with Takara on QC of IPS cells and products.
  • Their main focus for all these trials still seems on allogeneic use from IPS cell banks.

It will be interesting to see how trials in Japan develop versus those in other countries such as here in the US where I know of planned autologous IPS cell clinic efforts.

Top 10 Google Stem Cell News Stories: Perspectives

What does Google think (if Google does indeed think) are top 10 stem cell news stories right now?

I took a screen shot below.

Here are some thoughts on those stories.

top-stem-cell-headlines

First, lung organoids are neat, but they have been grown before by several groups. Why is that the top story? I’d have to ask Google. Better PR? Still looks interesting and could have real impact for lung disease in the future.

The second story is on the transplantation of allogeneic IPS cells into monkeys without immunosuppression.This is an important finding with clinical impact from Dr. Takahashi’s group.

That third story seems odd to me. Seems like an over the top claim.

The fourth one with its “for the first time” I’m not so sure about and number five seems to be on the same story. I have doubts about that trial given the lack of detail and the potential for harm to patients. It sounds premature.

Then we have cancer stem cell stories at number six and another at number eight.

Number seven and ten both refer to the experience of one patient in the Asterias stem cells for spinal cord injury trial. Number ten’s headline is dubious from a scientific perspective with its “as a result” claiming the stem cells made the man better for sure. I really hope that’s true, but we don’t know yet although more recent data on more patients is encouraging. Controls are needed in the long run to iron things out.

Number nine is about stem cell clinics. It seems to be the only one mentioning the historic FDA stem cell meeting this week.