NgAgo a-go-go: top 5 bullet points on upstart CRISPR challenger

NgAgoThe gene editing technology CRISPR has been arguably the top story in the biomedical world in the last two years, but going forward there is a CRISPR challenger in upstart gene editing technology NgAgo.

For more background on NgAgo and the key first published paper on its genetic modification characteristics see my post here. 

In the comments on that post and in discussions I’ve had with other researchers, some key points have crystalized on NgAgo versus CRISPR at this time. As a possible CRISPR challenger, how does NgAgo fare?

Broader possible applicability. The lack of a PAM site requirement for NgAgo means it is almost certain that for some specific gene editing applications, NgAgo will work and CRISPR won’t. Design of NgAgo guides seems to be a simpler matter too because no PAM is needed (more on guides below). In that first NgAgo paper they reported effective editing of 8 different genes with good efficiency so it’s unlikely there is a strongly required DNA sequence context needed for NgAgo. However, it is still formally possible that NgAgo in some contexts will have some kind of preference for certain DNA sequences.  Further study will help resolve this more concretely, but so far this is looking like a major plus for NgAgo.

DNA guides should be a lot easier. The use of DNA-based guides will make gene editing easier as opposed to RNA-based guides. At the very least you eliminate a cloning step and you can just order oligos, which you can phosphorylate in your lab to use as guides by transfection.

Continue reading