June 4, 2020

The Niche

Knoepfler lab stem cell blog

Jennifer Doudna

2 min read

A lot has been going on in the CRISPR world. Here are some key CRISPR updates. Editas has filed the paperwork on the road to going public as a company. Such an IPO, should it come to fruition, could raise billions of dollars. Will the other CRISPR companies like Caribou and CRISPR Therapeutics follow suit? Simplistically, it seems like the first CRISPR IPO could get the lion’s share of investor money, but then there’s the patent thing hanging over all of this (see below) Patent …Read More

3 min read

Now we hear from the scientists on the front lines of CRISPR, covered in this post #2 of the Human Gene Editing Meeting. You can read Post #1 here. Jennifer Doudna starts off the big human gene editing science session on the current state of the human gene editing science and CRISPR. She gave an overview of how this session will be organized including a panel discussion and questions from audience. Maria Jasin, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, was up next. She gave a …Read More

1 min read

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS)  summit on Human Gene Editing will begin in a few days on December 1 in Washington, D.C. This summit is in part the extension of discussions that started at a more informal meeting on CRISPR earlier this year in Napa organized by Jennifer Doudna and colleagues. The NAS meeting will bring together scientists, ethicists, and policymakers from around the world and in particular from the US, the UK, and China. These three countries are presently the hotbeds of …Read More

3 min read

A recent piece on CRISPR genetic modification in the New Yorker called The Gene Hackers or Human 2.0 by Michael Specter is striking in a number of ways. I highly recommend it. The article provides an in-depth look at CRISPR and its potential use for human editing. I like how the article brings so many viewpoints to bear on this important topic. The thing that struck me the most was the recounting of a dream, really a nightmare, that left CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna …Read More

4 min read

The international stem cell policy and ethics think tank, the Hinxton Group, weighed in yesterday on heritable human genetic modification with a new policy statement. The Hinxton statement is in many ways in agreement with the Baltimore, et al. Nature paper proposing a “prudent path forward” for human germline genetic modification, which came out of the Napa Meeting earlier this year. However, while several of the Napa authors have now thrown their public support behind a clinical pause or moratorium on heritable human modification …Read More