NgAgo a-go-go: top 5 bullet points on upstart CRISPR challenger

NgAgoThe gene editing technology CRISPR has been arguably the top story in the biomedical world in the last two years, but going forward there is a CRISPR challenger in upstart gene editing technology NgAgo.

For more background on NgAgo and the key first published paper on its genetic modification characteristics see my post here. 

In the comments on that post and in discussions I’ve had with other researchers, some key points have crystalized on NgAgo versus CRISPR at this time. As a possible CRISPR challenger, how does NgAgo fare?

Broader possible applicability. The lack of a PAM site requirement for NgAgo means it is almost certain that for some specific gene editing applications, NgAgo will work and CRISPR won’t. Design of NgAgo guides seems to be a simpler matter too because no PAM is needed (more on guides below). In that first NgAgo paper they reported effective editing of 8 different genes with good efficiency so it’s unlikely there is a strongly required DNA sequence context needed for NgAgo. However, it is still formally possible that NgAgo in some contexts will have some kind of preference for certain DNA sequences.  Further study will help resolve this more concretely, but so far this is looking like a major plus for NgAgo.

DNA guides should be a lot easier. The use of DNA-based guides will make gene editing easier as opposed to RNA-based guides. At the very least you eliminate a cloning step and you can just order oligos, which you can phosphorylate in your lab to use as guides by transfection.

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TGIF Science: funding, CRISPR v. NgAgo, secrets, Zika, & more

Some stuff on my mind for our TGIF Science this week.

Research Funding Ups: NIH. Is it my imagination or is NIH funding slightly improving? This is the overall vibe I’m hearing from the trenches.

TGIF science dart board

Modified Wikipedia image

Research Funding Ups and Downs: CIRM.  CIRM funded some basic research to the tune of a total of $4 million, which is great. On a personal level, just wish my “great idea” had fared better in review there. Kind of a downer, but after a while you get a really thick skin.

I’m still trying to decide what I think of CIRM 2.0’s grant review, especially their “positive” pre-review where there is no scoring or comments. You either make it or are triaged with no explanation or score given to applications. No sour grapes here from me on this particular DISC1 CIRM grant review, but even though my proposal made the cut to get fully reviewed, the actual review was too short, just a handful of vague sentences in total. That’s not helpful.

Secret genome meeting? I’m still scratching my head over that “secret” meeting on a synthetic human genome over at Harvard. They closed the door on the public, the press, etc. The reason given was that a journal had embargoed the heck out of ideas that would be presented at the meeting or something like that. 

CRISPR obsolete soon? George Church was quoted that CRISPR will be obsolete soon because of synthesizing entire genomes from scratch instead (see secret meeting entry above). Then of course there’s the upstart NgAgo that could be simpler and with broader applicability than CRISPR. What do you think of CRISPR versus NgAgo?

My sense is that talk of CRISPR obsolescence is premature kind of like Mark Twain’s quote that reports of his death were exaggerated.

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Will new gene editing tech NgAgo challenge CRISPR?

What could be better than CRISPR for gene editing?

A new genetic modification technology called NgAgo has some researchers really excited. How does it compare to CRISPR?

I’ll admit it that as a scientist who works on genetics and genomics, I am really enjoying the power and simplicity of CRISPR-Cas9 type technology for genome editing. We are working with it extensively in my lab. One of the remarkable things about CRISPR is how fast the technology has evolved in just the last 2 years.

NgAgo

NgAgo, Figure 5, Nature Biotechnology

Despite all that warp speed for CRISPR, some are asking: could NgAgo zoom past CRISPR?

While NgAgo is indeed a nifty new genome editing technology based on DNA guides instead of RNA guides, it’s not going to immediately race ahead of CRISPR…not yet any way. Still it’s got people buzzing.

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