May 29, 2020

The Niche

Knoepfler lab stem cell blog

stem cell book

1 min read

Every few years I do a survey of you guys so I can have a better sense of my blog’s readership. For that purpose, below I’ve got two polls to ask you (1) about your general backgrounds and (2) preferences about post content. Because some people may want to vote more than once on the types of posts they like the most, I’ve allowed re-voting on that poll. Free stuff? Those who participate and leave a comment or email me to indicate they did …Read More

3 min read

One of the difficult things about the regulatory sphere that covers stem cells in the US is that many aspects are confusing or puzzling both to the public and so-called experts. We’ve been talking through some of the questions that come up in this area in posts and comments on this blog. What does a warning letter really mean? What triggers it? Why do some businesses selling stem cells get inspected and others don’t? What do some entities get warning letters over the years, while …Read More

1 min read

Science can come in various forms ranging from numbers to words to images, but it’s always more fun as a contest. In the stem cell field, some of the images can be particularly striking. One of my own favorites is the one above that I took some years ago of differentiation of neural stem cells that ended up on the cover of my first book. Do you have a favorite stem cell-related image? I’m doing a stem cell image contest. The winner receives a …Read More

6 min read

By Jane Langille A few weeks ago, I wrote to Dr. Paul Knoepfler after reading his book Stem Cells: An Insider’s Guide because I was intrigued by his stem cell theory of aging. I wondered if his theory might mean that someone who mobilized and donated hematopoietic cells might be shortening their own lifetime supply. After exchanging emails about my daughter’s experience, he invited me to contribute a guest blog as he felt that the complexity of her experience as a donor and the questions …Read More

4 min read

A question that has come up with advances in stem cell technology: could same-sex couples have their own biological children? Since Shinya Yamanaka reprogrammed first mouse and then human ordinary cells into powerful pluripotent stem cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, back in 2006-2007 many new research avenues have opened up. The impossible suddenly seemed a lot more possible with the report of iPS cells (aka IPSC). People started asking many more creative questions, The biomedical sciences now had more potential to make the …Read More

2 min read

How are stem cells, nukes, and bikini experts connected? Let’s go back in time a bit… The idea of stem cells has been around more than a century. For example Dr. Artur Pappenheim made a cell fate tree including stem cells in 1905. You can read more about this amazing, more than 100-year old stem cell model in my book, Stem Cells: An Insider’s Guide. Even earlier in 1885, Dr. August Weismann discussed stem cells using the term “germ plasm” and in 1868 seems …Read More