Human embryo CRISPR pub includes plagiarism: the victim’s unique account

PlagiarismCut, modify, paste…

It’s kind of a CRISPR mantra for those of us using gene editing in the lab. But it’s supposed to be happening just on DNA, right?

Now it appears that someone on a team of human embryo CRISPR researchers possibly got carried away with the cutting-modifying-pasting mindset to take it beyond DNA to also do so with passages of another researcher’s published work that they apparently slightly modified and put into their own paper without any acknowledgement.

The 2016 article in question containing plagiarized passages was published by the lab of senior author Yong Fan with first author Xiangjin Kang, and was entitled, “Introducing precise genetic modifications into human 3PN embryos by CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome editing”. I blogged about the science and bigger picture policy issues of the Kang, et al. article last year here including the technical challenges of CRISPR’ing human embryos. Now the Erratum to the Kang piece in the journal JARG indicates that text plagiarism took place. I’ve included the entire Erratum near the bottom of this blog post.

Who got plagiarized? Continue reading

Meeting summary of Paris human gene editing workshop

Editors note: This is a guest post from Caroline Simons who is attending the two Paris meetings on human gene editing. For more background on those meetings see here.

By Caroline Simons

There were just over a hundred participants at the workshop organized by the Federation of European Academies of Medicine, the UK Academy of Medical Sciences and the Académie Nationale de Médicine France. That number included experts in the fields of science, medicine, law and bioethics. They came from Europe, the US and China (and, I think I may have heard, one French politician).Caroline Simons

Some were engaged in active research, others represented national academies, policy making bodies, patients, research funders and industry. I noted one participant from the US represented DARPA, a reminder that gene-editing technologies may have harmful as well as therapeutic applications. There were about a dozen journalists, of whom two may cover this event in English – Anna McKie of Research Fortnight and Oliver Moody of The Times.

Académie Nationale de Médicine

Académie Nationale de Médicine, Credit Caroline Simons

The aim of the workshop was to consider current scientific activities in the European Union (EU) regarding genome editing and the regulatory landscape across the EU member states for this research and its clinical application in humans. The stated intention was to foster discussion between experts, provide information to the public and stakeholders and to consider whether an EU regulatory framework to govern the safe and acceptable use of human genome editing is desirable, and how it could be achieved. There were no agreed conclusions or recommendations from this workshop, but many interesting presentations and observations. A paper which will draw on the workshop discussions is to be published.

Continue reading

NAS Meeting on Human Germline Modification Taking Shape

The US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) will hold a meeting on heritable human genetic modification on December 1-3, 2015 in Washington, D.C. Invitations to the NAS meeting to individuals starting going out last week.

The upcoming NAS meeting seeks to address these issues and discuss the possibility of a moratorium on clinical use of genetic modification technology. It could play a crucial role in shaping both national and global policy on human genetic modification.NAS gene editing

The meeting was sparked in part by rising concerns over the possibility that some scientists may race ahead to clinical use of new gene editing technologies such as CRISPR-Cas9. Such clinical use of human genetic modification technology could pose serious risks to both individuals and to science. Others have the opposite view and favor allowing heritable human editing to proceed as a natural course of science delineated only by existing regulations rather than a moratorium. An international meeting would have the goal to reach consensus on prudent policy in this area, just as the 1975 Asilomar meeting did on genetic engineering.

The NAS has announced that both the Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences are partnering on the new 2015 meeting. This is a positive step as it will increase the diverse, global views on the key issues. Leaders of both the new partners indicated their enthusiasm for the meeting:

“Human gene editing offers great promise for improving human health and well-being but it also raises significant ethical and societal issues,” said Royal Society President Paul Nurse.  “It is vital that we have a well-informed international debate about the potential benefits and risks, and this summit can hopefully set the tone for that discussion.”

Chinese Academy of Sciences President Chunli Bai said, “Both Chinese scientists and the government are aware of the pros and cons of human gene editing.  CAS scientists have organized a panel discussion and coordinated with related government agencies for regulatory policies on this issue.  We would like to work together with international communities for the proper regulation and application of such technology.”

One issue, however, is whether it could be a challenge for a meeting with such a broad spectrum of views and constituents to reach a focused consensus.

Details on the meeting are starting to come out on social media too.

Bioethicist Tetsuya Ishii tweeted about his invite to the meeting.

From the NAS website here are the meeting organizers:

  • David Baltimore (chair), president emeritus and Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena United States
  • Françoise Baylis, professor and Canada Research Chair in Bioethics and Philosophy, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia Canada
  • Paul Berg, Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor Emeritus and director emeritus, Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif. United States
  • George Q. Daley, Samuel E. Lux IV Professor of Hematology and Oncology, and director, Stem Cell Transplantation Program, Boston Children’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston United States
  • Jennifer A. Doudna, investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and professor, department of molecular and cell biology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and department of chemistry, University of California, Berkeley United States
  • Eric S. Lander, president and director, The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Mass. United States
  • Robin Lovell-Badge, group leader and head, division of stem cell biology and developmental genetics, The Francis Crick Institute, London United Kingdom
  • Pilar Ossorio, professor of law and bioethics, University of Wisconsin; and ethics scholar, Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison United States
  • Duanqing Pei, professor and director general, Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou China
  • Adrian Thrasher, professor of paediatric immunology, University College London United Kingdom
  • Ernst-Ludwig Winnacker, professor emeritus and director emeritus, Gene Center, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich Germany
  • Qi Zhou, professor and deputy director, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China