3 CIRM challenges: search for new prez, funding, & clinical POW!

The idea of CIRM as a dedicated state stem cell agency was one of the things that got me excited about starting my time as a professor doing research on stem cells in California way back in 2005-2006 on the job hunt. Fast forwarding to today now 11 years later, CIRM is still on the cutting edge, but some major things have changed for California’s stem cell agency and as it looks to its future, the questions and challenges are different too.CIRM 2.0

By analogy, the original CIRM was at first like a stem cell itself navigating its differentiation branches as it went. The new CIRM of 2017, what some call CIRM 2.0, is in contrast more like a developing tissue. It has matured and has a history to build upon as it continues. Today CIRM and its staff aren’t newbies. They were newbies by necessity when I came to California in 2006 because they were literally inventing themselves with no past example to use as a model. Now they are stem cell veterans and CIRM is trying to sort out its fresh path ahead relative to its current path rather than strike a path from scratch.

Three key areas need tackling to navigate the new path for maximum positive impact.

Funding. Does CIRM 2.0 and its backers go for a “Prop 71 2.0” to get another round of California state funding? If so, how much and how to approach the voters? If not (or if “yes”, but the effort isn’t successful), where does CIRM get its funding to continue? Of course, in theory a third option is that CIRM simply ends when its current funding runs out, but to me that’s not a real option. CIRM cannot end because it has so much more to do and it is in some ways just getting to the most exciting part: the bedside part of the bench-to-bedside path. Update: over at California Stem Cell Report, David Jensen has the scoop on an industry-centric stem cell bond proposal idea.

New Prez. CIRM 2.0 President and CEO Randy Mills announced the surprising news recently that he’s moving on from CIRM after a relatively short, but impactful tenure. Who will be the new CIRM President? It’s anybody’s guess at this point, but I’d say that CIRM needs to achieve two things at once here: move very quickly to get a new leader and make that leader be a fantastic choice for CIRM. What exactly do I mean by the latter? The new CIRM President ideally should have impeccable stem cell credentials and also big picture clinical vision as well as strong leadership skills. I asked CIRM where things stand on the President search today and CIRM Sr. Director Public Communications & Patient Advocate Outreach, Kevin McCormack, provided this quote:

“the Presidential Search subcommittee is going to be meeting on July 17th to evaluate the options regarding appointing a permanent President and CEO to replace Randy. They’ll then make their recommendations to the full Board.”

I’m planning a future post to throw some names out on the table for discussion of people who might be considered for the position by CIRM.

Clinical POW! CIRM’s mission is focused on having transformative clinical impact so the agency needs some snap, crackle, and POW! on that front moving forward. It already has provided key support for a number of ongoing clinical trials and the goal moving forward is final approved products that are proven safe and effective. I would call that some stem cell POW! Not everything is going to be a success, but I predict that some will.

I believe that CIRM has the potential to achieve all this. That doesn’t mean it’ll be easy, but what great things have ever been easy?

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