October 30, 2020

The Niche

Knoepfler lab stem cell blog

More Liveyon links to far-out exosome Awakening film include potential relative

A new film-commercial entitled Awakening pitches unproven exosomes and has already been possibly tied to the troubled stem cell supplier firm Liveyon, but now it seems that the links go far deeper including a possible relative of Liveyon leader John Kosolcharoen.

Even so, Kosolcharoen (pictured with another Liveyon leader Alan Gaveck below in a web video) recently denied involvement in an email exchange with me.

Awakening drew so much attention in part because of its strong sci-fi vibe and its implication that the exosome product could reverse aging, couldn’t be contaminated, etc.

A screenshot of a video of John Kosolcharoen (right) and Alan Gaveck (left) of Liveyon.

The striking nature of the film-ad might be one reason why some readers of The Niche became amateur sleuths looking for ties between Liveyon and Awakening. They have found quite a lot.

What we already found

For instance, shortly after I first posted about Awakening, a reader in a comment noted that in the behind-the-scenes photos from the production of the film, one of the crew seemed to be wearing a Liveyon t-shirt. It was easy for me to find that same photo.

When I asked Kosolcharoen about this, he told me that the Awakening film company had in the past worked for Liveyon and gotten Liveyon t-shirts back then that perhaps just by chance they were wearing now while working on Awakening.

Chris Centeno of Regenexx who was the first to notice the film was able to determine that the white Rolls-Royce ghost (an approximately $450,000 car) in the film actually belonged to Kosolcharoen based on its “LIVEYON” license plate. I asked Kosolcharoen about his car being in the film and he said he just lent the filmmaker his car. Centeno found other apparent connections too including Liveyon links being in the source code for the film’s website.

Awakening film marketing screenshot Liveyon Elysian
Screenshot of Awakening film marketing on an unproven exosome product.

A new find: relative Andrew Christensen tying things together?

The only name identifiable with the purported biotech company Elysian Biologics that is apparently at the heart of the film was an Andrew Christensen, whose LinkedIn profile says he’s a regional manager for Liveyon and is originally from Arkdale, WI.

A sleuthing reader let me know that while s/he didn’t find much of anything with a Google search for “Andrew Christensen John Kosolcharoen”, with more persistence a follow-up search for Andy Christensen John Kosolcharoen produced this obituary for a Jane L. Christensen. The obit seems to tie things together.

Since the obit’s list of survivors (quoted below, emphasis mine) indicates that John Kosolcharoen of L.A. and Andy (Andrew) Christensen of Arkdale are both Jane Christensen’s grandsons, doesn’t that mean that they are cousins or even half-brothers?

“She is survived by daughter, Katherine (Art) Stormoen of Friendship; son, Bruce (Lois) Christensen, Adams; son, Dennis (Donna) Christensen of Adams; son, Lynn (Cindy) Christensen of Adams; grandson, Rod (Jodi) Stormoen of Friendship; grandson, Hans (Andrea) Christensen of Mauston, grandson, Robert (Miranda) Christensen of Adams; granddaughter, Mary (Neil O’Connell) Christensen of Waukesha; grandson, Andy (Erin) Christensen of Arkdale; granddaughter, Susie (Jeff) Bell of Mauston; granddaughter, April Christensen of Washington D.C.; granddaughter, Alexa Christensen of Montana; grandson, John Kosolcharoen of Los Angeles; grandson, Mike (Erin) Kosolcharoen of Madison; grandson, Ken Kotlowski, Jr. of Mooresville, NC; grandson, Scott (Tanya) Kotlowski of Friendship; 14 great-grandchildren and one on the way; one great-great-grandson.”

I emailed Kosolcharoen to ask if he’s related to Andrew (Andy) Christensen (who again seems to both work for Liveyon and is somehow behind Elysian) but got no reply.

Liveyon is registrar of film website

Then another reader gave me a heads up about another connection. Liveyon is listed as the registrar of the website URL (https://exoshortfilm.com/) for the Awakening film. This indicates that Liveyon either set up the film website and owns it, or at least whoever did register the website listed Liveyon as the registrar.

Since it’s so easy these days to mask/protect the information about who owns or registers a website, why didn’t Liveyon do this if indeed they did register the URL?

The film website’s registrar’s email is listed as [email protected] Then searching the web for that email finds a Liveyon webpage mentioning a Rommel F. Aleman. His LinkedIn page says he’s head of IT at Liveyon.

Many connections in total

So, to sum up by putting it all together, since (1) Liveyon supplied the fancy car for the film, (2) someone at Liveyon apparently registered the film’s website which (3) also has Liveyon links embedded in it, (4) at least one of the people working behind the scenes on the film was wearing a Liveyon t-shirt, and the only known person Andrew/Andy Christensen linked to the firm Elysian behind the film both (6) lists Liveyon as his employer on LinkedIn and (7) may be related to John Kosolcharoen, is it safe to say that Liveyon is indeed a meaningful part of this whole film/Elysian exosome thing?

Hopefully Kosolcharoen or Christensen or someone else will clear it all up soon.

Finally, note that it seems that Elysian plans to market the exosome product in question outside the U.S., which would make it outside the realm of the FDA in some ways, but if the exosome product is produced in the U.S. and then exported to another country then I believe the FDA would have some oversight of those steps at least.

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