January 18, 2021

The Niche

Trusted stem cell blog & resources

Search Results for: ips cells

3 min read

We’ve had another week of interesting stem cell news and papers. Here is an aggregate of the stem cell and regenerative medicine week that was. Stem cell therapy for baldness I’ve covered stem cells for hair loss for about a decade here on The Niche. While it seems like it’s taken a long time for this work to advance, there has been concrete progress. From Nature News, Regenerative medicine could pave the way to treating baldness. Here’s the actual Nature paper in question: Hair-bearing human …Read More

2 min read

Once or twice a month I do a post on notable stem cell publications and news, which often but not always include research on iPS cells. It’s sort of a recommended reads kind of post, but I often include one or two things that aren’t necessarily recommended exactly yet seem kind of surprising or novel in some ways. Here’s today’s list. One bit of news first On the RMAT front: “FDA Grants RMAT Designation for CAR T-Cell Therapy for Multiple Myeloma.”  You can see …Read More

4 min read

CRISPR and IPS cells are two of my favorite things so when they come together as in a cool, new paper from Sheng Ding’s lab, I’m excited to read it and curious as to what the scoop is. Since 2006-2007 when mouse and human reprogramming were first reported, many different methods have been explored to make induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells. Along the way we’ve all learned quite a lot about how pluripotency is regulated, whether it is in the context of maintenance or …Read More

1 min read

Where is the field of IPS cells going and how will this impact the overall field of stem cell-based regenerative medicine? Nobel Laureate Shinya Yamanaka, the discoverer of IPS cells, gave a really interesting recent interview to Nikkei that provides some fascinating insights into the future of this exciting technology that is now more than a decade old. For simplicity I have indicated top highlights from the Yamanaka interview below as bullet points. More IPS cell trials are on track to start as soon as 2018 …Read More

1 min read

Here are some headlines & articles worth a look and some thought on stem cell and biomedical science more generally. Gallup finds in a new poll that 60% of Americans surveyed find human embryonic stem celsl research “largely acceptable”. On the other hand human reproductive cloning is highly frowned upon, sandwiched in the “highly unacceptable category between suicide, polygamy, and infidelity. Notably, even cloning of animals was viewed pretty negatively. Time Magazine’s piece Friday on Gordie Howe, who just passed away, and his controversial …Read More

2 min read

A new study on treating pain with a unique stem cell connection caught my attention. The paper was from a team at Pfizer led by Edward B. Stevens. Talk about bench to bedside, these researchers went all the way from patients to patient somatic cells to reprogrammed IPSC to neurons to model pain in a dish and then test a drug in a dish, and then finally to test the drug in the patients. The drug in questions is the Nav1.7 blocker, PF-05089771. The team found that …Read More

4 min read

It’s been a great couple days so far here at the World Stem Cell Summit in Atlanta. You can follow it on Twitter using the #WSCS15 hash tag. I first attended it 5 years ago in Pasadena. One of the special aspects of WSCS is it brings together diverse stakeholders in a way that just doesn’t happen elsewhere. For instance, you can have the FDA, patients, physicians, scientists, and funding agency people all in one room together. Some strong impressions so far include the …Read More

4 min read

Just how good are human embryonic stem (ES) cells made by therapeutic cloning via nuclear transfer, with the successful technique first reported by the lab of Shoukhrat Mitalipov at OHSU last year? How do they compare to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells or traditional ES cells made from IVF embryos? A new paper in Nature directly tackles these key questions, but first a bit of context. Three separate groups have now successfully made ES cells using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). I have reviewed those three therapeutic cloning papers …Read More

1 min read

What happens if we start using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells clinically in humans? A cool new paper recently came out that gets us closer to being able to predict an answer. It’s an important question as iPS cell-derived cellular products are getting closer to clinical use. For example, the first iPS cell-based clinical trial began to enroll patients in Japan last year in a clinical study related to macular degeneration (see my interview with Dr. Masayo Takahashi, who is leading that intriguing study). …Read More