CRISPR babies

Live Blogging #GeneEditSummit Day 1 Post #3: human germline modification

Robin-Lovell-Badge-Peter-Braude-George-Church

The post-lunch session is “Applications of Gene Editing Technology: Human Germline Modification”. Prior to hearing it I’m curious how cautious or gung-ho the speakers will be, or if their gestalt will be one of balance in the middle somewhere. Robin Lovell-Badge, The Francis Crick Institute, was the moderator of this session. He said, “We’d be …

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Live Blogging #GeneEditSummit Day 1 Post #2: State of the Science, #CRISPR

Human-gene-editing-science-session-small

Now we hear from the scientists on the front lines of CRISPR, covered in this post #2 of the Human Gene Editing Meeting. You can read Post #1 here. Jennifer Doudna starts off the big human gene editing science session on the current state of the human gene editing science and CRISPR. She gave an …

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Live Blogging NAS Human Gene Editing Summit: #GeneEditSummit

Jennifer-Doudna

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS)  summit on Human Gene Editing will begin in a few days on December 1 in Washington, D.C. This summit is in part the extension of discussions that started at a more informal meeting on CRISPR earlier this year in Napa organized by Jennifer Doudna and colleagues. The NAS meeting …

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Haunting Doudna nightmare about Hitler wanting CRISPR

Nazi-Propaganda-Poster-Eugenics

A recent piece on CRISPR genetic modification in the New Yorker called The Gene Hackers or Human 2.0 by Michael Specter is striking in a number of ways. I highly recommend it. The article provides an in-depth look at CRISPR and its potential use for human editing. I like how the article brings so many …

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Kelly Hills interview: human genetic modification & bioethics

Kelly-Hills

Below is a conversation with bioethics commentator Kelly Hills (who BTW has a great blog), tackling some of the key issues surrounding the potential use of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to make heritable human genetic modification. I really appreciate her clear and insightful answers to some tough questions that many are grappling with today on this topic. Part …

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Congress: FDA should consult religious experts on embryo CRISPR

Crystal_Structure_of_Cas9_in_Complex_with_Guide_RNA_and_Target_DNA

The US Congress recently held its first hearing on human germline genetic modification. The meeting included CRISPR-Cas9 pioneer Jennifer Doudna (see video here) on the panel. See image of Cas9 structure from Wikipedia. CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful, strikingly efficient tool for genetic engineering of cells and whole organisms. Now Republican congressional leaders have included a …

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Doudna & Others Testify to Congress on CRISPR, Human Germline Editing

Jennifer-Doudna

The House Subcommittee on Research and Technology on Tuesday held a CRISPR hearing: “The Science and Ethics of Genetically Engineered Human DNA”. At the meeting, CRISPR pioneer Dr. Jennifer Doudna gave testimony along with Dr. Victor Dzau who is the President of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), Dr. …

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Guest Post by Chris Scott–The Great CRISPR Controversy: What’s Next?

CRISPR-primates

A decade ago I wrote an article in the journal Nature Biotechnology about the rise of a new gene editing technology called zinc finger nucleases (ZNF). It was one of those “drumbeat” discoveries: at the time, my sense was it would revolutionize how we deliver genes to cells and tissues, and profoundly change the way …

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