September 28, 2020

The Niche

Knoepfler lab stem cell blog

Reprogramming

3 min read

Reading to them was one of my favorite things to do with my kids when they were little, but it’s a long way from Goodnight Moon to this week’s list of recommended reads, although “bee brain” may have got their attention. Please take a minute to complete our The Niche reader survey for a chance at a bundle of free stem cell swag including my 3 books and a t-shirt. Media James Gorman, NY Times, The Vikings Were More Complicated Than You Might Think …Read More

3 min read

Every so often I realize I’ve accumulated a bunch of tabs on my browsers of things I need to dive into as time permits, which sometimes translates into a collection of recommended reads here on The Niche. Here are some recommended recent reads in the stem cell/regenerative medicine field and childhood cancer space. It includes some great science and complex social and policy developments and opinions. ‘I just want to live’: California man pleads with scientists around the world to ‘CRISPR me’. Remarkably this …Read More

4 min read

CRISPR and IPS cells are two of my favorite things so when they come together as in a cool, new paper from Sheng Ding’s lab, I’m excited to read it and curious as to what the scoop is. Since 2006-2007 when mouse and human reprogramming were first reported, many different methods have been explored to make induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells. Along the way we’ve all learned quite a lot about how pluripotency is regulated, whether it is in the context of maintenance or …Read More

2 min read

A team at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel led by Jacob Hanna reports today near perfect reprogramming efficiency to make induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by eliminating a single factor called Mbd3 from the cellular equation. On first glance, the Nature article (Rais, et al.) seems to be all about boosting cellular reprogramming efficiency to close to 100%. If that were the whole story of this paper then it would likely not draw major interest and probably would not have been published in Nature. Why? The …Read More