Search Results for: crispr

David Baltimore, et al. path for human germline engineering

human-germline-editing-policy

In a new perspectives piece in Science, Nobel Laureate David Baltimore and co-authors including Jennifer Doudna and George Church, chart a potential path forward for human germline engineering. See also accompanying Bioethics piece by Gretchen Vogel as well, “Embryo engineering alarm”. In the piece, entitled “A prudent path forward for genomic engineering and germline gene …

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Intensifying dialogue on human germline gene editing

egg-edit

The field recently saw Lanphier, et al. in Nature calling for a moratorium on human germilne CRISPR genetic modification. A number of additional stakeholders are expected to be weighing in soon on the issue of human germline gene editing. For example, a Science paper from others in the gene editing community is anticipated soon and may well have somewhat different perspectives. I’ve been …

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Proposed Moratorium on Genetic Modification of Human Germ Cells

sperm-and-egg

One of the hottest topics in the biomedical world in 2015 is heritable human genetic modification including via germ cells. There is an unsettling sense that genetically modified human germ cells and eventually GMO human beings are likely coming even if science and society are not ready for it. There are a hodgepodge of laws against human …

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George Church on Germline Human Genetic Modification

George-Church

I recently interviewed leading genomics scientist George Church on the ways that trends in genomics are changing our world. We also discussed the possibility of heritable human genetic modification. These days we more often call this “CRISPR babies.” His answers suggest that genomics and gene editing are poised to radically change our world. They could literally …

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Horwitz Interview Zooms in on Allen Cell Institute: the GoogleMaps of Cells

Rick-Horwitz

One of the most exciting developments in the biomedical sciences in 2014 was the announcement of the new Allen Institute for Cell Science. This new institute, which will be focused on cell biology, received $100 million in funding from high-tech pioneer and philanthropist, Paul Allen. I am very curious about how the institute will tackle cell …

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Diabetes Stem Cell Milestone: ViaCyte Transplants 1st Patient

viacyte-encaptra

Chalk up another exciting development for the stem cell and regenerative medicine field in 2014 related to diabetes. It’s been a huge year. (Update: read my Fall 2019 interview with ViaCyte here.) For the first time ever, an ES cell-based device has been transplanted into a diabetic patient. ViaCyte working together with Dr. Robert Henry …

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Challenge tries to cancel Yamanaka iPS cell patent

Patent-challenge

A new patent dispute has exploded in the stem cell field related to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. What’s going on? In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka reported cellular reprogramming to create mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in Cell and the next year multiple groups along with Yamanaka’s reported creating human iPS cells. It’s no exaggeration …

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Knoepfler Lab

The Knoepfler Lab conducts stem and cancer cell as well as chromatin/epigenetics research at the UC Davis School of Medicine. Our team has two big picture goals: (1) catalyzing the development of more effective treatments for cancers based on targeting stem cell-related machinery in tumorigenesis and (2) producing safer stem cell-based regenerative medicine therapies. We are particularly …

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Histone H3.3: giving cells epigenetic flexibility

chromosomal bridge in histone H3.3 knockout

A relatively newly recognized, important player in the stem cell field is a molecule called histone H3.3. Histones are key components of chromatin with integral roles in regulating almost all aspects of cell behavior through orchestrating functions such as transcription and chromosome segregation. Histone H3.3 knockout My lab has just (April 9) published new studies …

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